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28 April 2008
Let's reform local government
The Tories set up a pretty good system of local government back in the 1880s, only to start damaging it in the 1970s with the Heath-Walker reforms. This emasculation continued under the Blatcherite years that have run since 1979 to the present day.

The Daily Telegraph has advocated the restoration of local democracy for quite some time. Their aim, obviously, is to damage what they refer to as Labour's client state, but stripped of the rhetoric, this campaign is going after the same creatures that we as working class people so despise.

The thesis that working class districts are little more than colonial territories, run by a class of colonial administrators made up largely of social work filth, the teaching trade and local government time-servers, is one that this blog has long been arguing.

It looks to me as if we have the beginnings of a new political issue, here, and one that could just wake people up out of their torpor. People who agree with this argument from the right will argue that it is about saving money. We can argue that it is about using resources to recreate the unskilled and semi-skilled jobs that our people want.

Either way, it is also about doing over the local polywallahs who make up the colonial administration - and that is a worthwhile end in itself.
2 Comments:

I agree. What would you do? How about 'twinning' every ward that has a turnout below 20% with one that has a turnout above that nearby, then abolishing both if they fail to come up? That would force middle class wards and parties to take an interest.

Or how about abolishing 2/3 of councillors, then allowing the remaining units to raise or lower local taxes and be responsible for their own spending?

Or how about prohibiting any government employee from being a member of a council, including teachers?

Or how about a drive to empower local magistrates on the basis that the magistrates are drawn from a mix of all local communities, but with a language requirement?

The sad truth about local government in England is that it does not work, is grasping and expensive, and is staffed by a good few chumps. What few people there are who are any good tend to get sidelined too.

28 April 2008 at 10:24  

There are massives of social workers employed in politics. I'd happily ban all social workers from political appointments.

I'm delighted to say that with all the fuss and litigation kicked off in the UK, every time they take a child into care the insurance premiums have skyrocketed.

Insurance in 2007 used to be £150, this year it's £4,125 per child in care.
That's more than 27 times increase. WOOHOO. Insurance companies can see the litigation brewing.

We need to increase this to £40,000 per child.

Yes, tactically we're using insurance premiums as a way to control social workers - that says how bad things have got. But Money talks, and the Local Authorities understand it.

This really is the old epic struggle of the people versus the state.
Roll on elections on 1st May. I predict a hammering for New Labour. We're all tactically voting. We don't care if its conservatives or Liberals or Independents that are voted in, as long as Police State Labour are trumped - and removed from power.

28 April 2008 at 13:33  

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